Health

 

HEALTH MATTERS!

One of the problems concerning any minority breed is to maintain sufficient genetic diversity. Click here for further information on the Cesky Terrier Genetic Diversity Project.

The Cesky Terrier is a very healthy breed, but as with any living creature there are problems can occur from time to time.

Patella Luxation has been seen in the Cesky Terrier and further information, including a form that can be downloaded HERE can be submitted to the Cesky Terrier Club so that we can keep an eye on this condition.

The only known inherited condition in Cesky Terriers is Scottie Cramp. This is a locomotive problem probably caused by a lack of serotonin in the body. Scottie Cramp is not life-threatening, nor is it painful for the dog, but affected dogs should never be bred from. It is sufficiently rare than many vets may never have seen a case, and owners should be aware that the administration of serotonin inhibitors (eg aspirin, penicillin) can make the condition worse.

There is no test for the disease, and owners may never realise that there is anything wrong with their dog. There have been a handful of cases in the twenty years that the Cesky Terrier has been in the UK, and known carriers have been removed from the breeding pool. If, as an owner, you have any suspicions that your dog is suffering from Scottie Cramp, please tell your breeder and/or the Breed Health co-ordinator. It is assumed that this disease is inherited via a simple autosomal recessive, and can therefore appear very unexpectedly after generations of clear dogs.

One of the ancestors of the Cesky Terrier is the Sealyham, and that breed suffers from a very painful eye condition known as Primary Lens Luxation. Although PLL has never been recorded in the Cesky Terrier in the UK, our breed club feels that it is desirable that, in the light of their ancestry, all Cesky Terriers should be eye-tested as a responsible precaution. Eye testing clinics are arranged from time to time by the breed club, or can be sourced through advertisements in the two canine newspapers.

It is the wish of every breeder that the Cesky Terriers they produce will live long happy, healthy lives. Even the healthiest dog can occasionally be ill, however, and in line with Kennel Club policy, the Cesky Terrier Club endeavours to monitor the health status of the breed.

Breeders rely on the people who have puppies from them to keep in touch and to report any health problems. An Annual Health Survey gives an overview of the general health of the breed, but can only be truly informative if as many owners complete it as possible. Please complete and return the Health Survey to the Breed Health Co-ordinator.

Two events that impact on every living creature are birth and death. If you breed a litter of puppies please complete a Breeding Report form. Death is always sad, but it really is of great help to know at what age and from what cause our Cesky Terriers die. A Cause of Death form would be of real benefit to the breed, and the contribution that you make by sending one to the Breed Health Co-ordinator would be immense, and greatly appreciated.

As Cancer seems to be the main health problem in the Cesky, below is a form that the Health Co-ordinator would appreciate you fill in, if your Cesky is diagnosed.

It is not necessary to be a member of the Cesky Terrier Club to fill in any of the below forms.  All information provided is of great importance for the future of the breed.

Cancer Report

Breeding Report                                     Cause of Death Report

Informed Consent

The Cesky Terrier Club operates an informed consent database. All information sent to the Breed Health Co-ordinator remains confidential unless the owner specifically authorizes release of the information into the public domain. Owners are encouraged to release all information, realising it is in the ultimate health interests of the breed. For those not quite ready to accept open sharing of information, there is still value in submitting their results. All test information entered into the database is available in aggregate for research and statistical reporting purposes, but does not disclose identification of individual dogs.

 Posted by at 8:31 pm